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Blade Runner

Swade <wades2>

Tue, 8 Oct 1996 18:13:28 -0400

I think that Blade Runner may have actually contained a little VR, the memory implants. Granted, it's knid of VR in the past tense, I think it still qualifies.

As far as Deckard (sp?) being a replicant, I'm pretty convinced he is. The dream, the other 'cop' knowing about it, the pictures, the piano and the same song that Rachel played. And why did Roy spare him at the end? Was it because Roy finally valued life when his was ending (as the voice-over in the original version says) or was it because Roy knew and just wanted to show Deckard what it was like to be on the other side of the gun so that he would change?

Swade

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Re: Blade Runner

Tue, 08 Oct 1996 19:03:40 -0400

Tony Mrazik <mrazia@rpi.edu>

At 06:13 PM 10/8/96 -0400, Slade wrote:

>

>As far as Deckard (sp?) being a replicant, I'm pretty convinced he is. The

>dream, the other 'cop' knowing about it, the pictures, the piano and the

>same song that Rachel played. And why did Roy spare him at the end? Was it

>because Roy finally valued life when his was ending (as the voice-over in the

>original version says) or was it because Roy knew and just wanted to show

>Deckard what it was like to be on the other side of the gun so that he would

>change?

>

If anyone would have asked me before the movie if Deckard was a replicant (I won't admit how many times I have seen it) I would have said no way. But after listening to the inputs from other members of the class I have to agree that he is. I think the reason that the other cop/runner knew he was one was because he is one himself.

A theory on why Roy spared him at the end was because he really only wanted Deckard to experience what it was like living in fear.

Something completely off the What is the one scene in any movie that has stuck with you the longest and why? Mine would have to be the opening scene in Star Wars. I think it was the first movie I had ever seen in a real theater, and to see and hear this HUGE ship slowly taking over the screen was just so intense. It just isn't the same on a 19" TV.

Tony

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Re: Blade Runner

Tony Bartling <bartla@rpi.edu>

Wed, 9 Oct 1996 12:03:05 -0400 (EDT)

On Tue, 8 Oct 1996, Swade wrote:

>

> As far as Deckard (sp?) being a replicant, I'm pretty convinced he is. The

> dream, the other 'cop' knowing about it, the pictures, the piano and the

> same song that Rachel played. And why did Roy spare him at the end? Was it

> because Roy finally valued life when his was ending (as the voice-over in the

> original version says) or was it because Roy knew and just wanted to show

> Deckard what it was like to be on the other side of the gun so that he would

> change?

>

> Swade

>

>

I thought that the song Rachel and Deckard played was insignificant, other than as a device to draw attention to the piano itself, and the similarities between the two characters. If you recall, there was sheet music on the piano, and it is highly likely that they were simply playing from the music.

--Tony

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RE: Blade Runner

Ted Cooper <coopep>

Thu, 10 Oct 1996 00:55:59 -0400

Ah, but what are the odds that the replicant had learned to play the piano, much less that song? Only been alive a few years, probably. I think it's unlikely they would both know the song unless they had a common background.

Wait, I'm gonna have to argue with myself here. The song was probably programmed into Rachel, and Deckard knew all about the replicants... could he have known they knew that song (very likely) and decided to learn it himself? Quite possible, means Deckard could have just known a lot about the replicants and started acting/dreaming like them. Means he isn't necessarily a replicant, just knew 'em real well. And when the Nexus 6 leader chased him down and then spared him, Deckard finally understood them completely. That makes a lot of sense, come to think of it....

Well, I ramble, but I think there was a point in there somewhere,

Ted

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RE: Blade Runner

Tony Bartling <bartla@rpi.edu>

Thu, 10 Oct 1996 15:26:45 -0400 (EDT)

Why should it be that Rachel had to know the song already? She had the memories of a real person, and it is quite probable that one of the memories she got was the ability to play the piano. Since she already knew how to play, she probably also knew how to read music, because the two do go hand-in-hand, so it's not like she was playing off the top of her head. I'm sorry to argue a rather meaningless point here, since I do believe that Deckard could be a replicant (but I'm not sure), but I just don't think that the piano scene had as much to do with the movie as everybody else did.

--Tony

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Re: Blade Runner

Agent Webb <webbj>

Fri, 11 Oct 1996 08:54:22 -0400 (EDT)

Swade reported:

> I think that Blade Runner may have actually contained a little VR, the

> memory implants. Granted, it's knid of VR in the past tense, I think it

> still qualifies.

>

> As far as Deckard (sp?) being a replicant, I'm pretty convinced he is. The

> dream, the other 'cop' knowing about it, the pictures, the piano and the

> same song that Rachel played. And why did Roy spare him at the end? Was it

I might have to rent this again to be sure, but wasn't there sheet music on the piano? If so it wouldn't make it a very strong argument (in my opinion). However, I do think that there is a lot of evidence that the Blade Runners were replicants. I felt that this was implied by Roy killing Tyrell. Here we see a replicant who is 'more human than human', and who has killed so many people, destroy the man who made him. How else could a lone Deckard take on a killing machine like this, unless he was one himself? That may be a weak argument (I might be reading to much into the film).

-jon webb-

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Re: Blade Runner

lavalj@rpi.edu (Jean-Etienne LaVallee)

Wed, 16 Oct 1996 05:41:56 GMT

Heyas,

>I think that Blade Runner may have actually contained a little VR, the

>memory implants. Granted, it's knid of VR in the past tense, I think it

>still qualifies.

I haven't got the book lying about, but there was a very interesting thing in the novel that was a machine through which many people could share a "religious" experience which involved experiencing a stoning while attempting to climb a mountain, but never reaching the top. It was a full sensory consentual sort of thing and would actually mentally and physically drain a person experiencing it. Kinda a strange P.K.Dick plot device, I think.

>As far as Deckard (sp?) being a replicant, I'm pretty convinced he is. The

To add to your points, the scene where he uses the photo analysis computer and is conversing with the interface. I have the soundtrack to the film which contains this entire audio section in the openning song. The interesting thing about the "dialog" is that you hear Deckard talking in a calm but mechanical tone and on the other side you hear the clicks and beeps of the machine/computer analyzing the photo. Either this is a comment on the integration of computers into society at that point or it's a hint at Deckards own mechination.

Here's one for you's: do you think the replicants are really more human than human at that point in history given that humanity had gone so far as to lose it's humanity? What I mean is, the replicants are very romantic beings, they are tragic and violent and struggle with their mortality while the "humans" are only preocuppied with following their rules and being a part of the rather ugly social machine. Who's human in that case?

l8r,

Etienne

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Re: Blade Runner

"Garden Gnome" <andret@rpi.edu>

Wed, 16 Oct 1996 13:00:14 -0400

> Here's one for you's: do you think the replicants are really

> more human than human at that point in history given that humanity had

> gone so far as to lose it's humanity? What I mean is, the replicants

> are very romantic beings, they are tragic and violent and struggle

> with their mortality while the "humans" are only preocuppied with

> following their rules and being a part of the rather ugly social

> machine. Who's human in that case?

>

>-- End of excerpt from Jean-Etienne LaVallee

I think it depends on the replicants in question and the time frame you examine them in. For example, at the movie's end, I definitely considered Roy more human than Deckard (although his humanity was in question anyway). I wouldn't say that Leon (I think that's his name, anyway the one who appeared first and killed the Blade Runner at Nexus Corp) or Zorra were particularly human but I think Roy and Priss were. They seemed to have a much greater appreciation of life since theirs was so limited. Again, the best example of Roy's humanity is his saving of Deckard at the movies end. I believe that he had come to love life so much that he couldn't let Deckard die. Even though he wanted revenge against Deckard for killing the others, it seems that Roy also wanted to teach Deckard a lesson by showing Deckard what it is like to know that you are going to die.

gg

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Class web site created Fall 1996 by:
Ted Cooper, Brian Mardirosian, Tony Mrazik, and Sarah Takatani.