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Subsections


   
Accessing Files Permitted to You

If someone has permitted a file to you, you can read or print it simply by specifying the file's entire path in the command. For example, to read the file lab12 in lucez's public directory, you could enter the following command:
\begin{alltt}\bf
more \~{}lucez/public/lab12
\end{alltt}

         
Checking File Permissions

To check the permissions of the current directory, use the fs listacl command. As shown below, you may also use the abbreviation la instead of listacl; think of it as standing for ``list access."
\begin{alltt}\tt
{\bf fs la}
Access list for /home/60/ramabz is
Normal rights:
system:anyuser l
ramabz rlidwka
\end{alltt}
This access control list tells you that the user ramabz has ALL permissions for her directory (rlidwka), while others can just list the files in her directory (anyuser l). In this example, the userid ramabz is the only name on the ACL for this directory. If other users had specific permissions, they would appear in this listing as well. Any subdirectories you create will inherit the default permissions of the parent directory. However, subsequently changing the default permissions of the parent will not automatically change the permissions of the subdirectories.
next up previous contents
Next: Changing File Permissions: Working Up: Sharing Files on RCS Previous: Understanding File Permissions
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