Inside Rensselaer
Volume 7, No. 8, April 26, 2013
   

Rensselaer Nanotechnology Research Partnerships Featured at National Academy of Sciences Symposium

*          
*

President 
Shirley Ann Jackson

  Vice President Jonathan Dordick   Professor John Wen
President
Shirley Ann Jackson
  Vice President Jonathan Dordick   Professor John Wen
*

Nanotechnology researchers at Rensselaer play a vital role in strengthening New York state’s innovation ecosystem, Institute President Shirley Ann Jackson said in a recent keynote address at a U.S. National Academy of Sciences (NAS) symposium examining New York’s nanotechnology model.

President Jackson, along with two other Rensselaer officials, spoke at the two-day forum organized by the NAS, hosted by Hudson Valley Community College, and jointly sponsored by Rensselaer, Global Foundries, and the Center for Economic Growth on April 3 and 4.

Through this forum, and others like it around the country, the NAS is examining successful research partnerships between government, industry, and universities, from which national policy lessons can be drawn.

“Life-changing, job-creating, security-sustaining scientific discoveries and technological innovations in the United States have long been driven by a strong collaboration among business, government, and academe. This three-way partnership has created an ‘innovation ecosystem’ that has driven our economy, our prosperity, and our well-being for decades,” President Jackson said.

“Breakthroughs in nanotechnology are changing everything from microelectronics, to energy, to manufacturing, to health care. Whether it is making more advanced computer chips, better batteries, stronger steel, better lighting, more resilient buildings, or bacteria-resistant paint coatings, Rensselaer nanotechnology researchers are changing the world,” President Jackson said. “Rensselaer has a long history of partnering with New York state and private companies to build the research facilities, create the programs, and attract the people that have generated fundamental discoveries, attracted large-scale federalresearch investments, commercialized technologies, and created startup companies.”

Vice President for Research Jonathan Dordick presented a talk on “Advancing Nano-biotechnology” in a session on Nanotechnology and Biomedical Sciences, and participated in the closing roundtable discussion on “New York’s Innovation Future.”
  *
Nanotechnology Research  
   
A team of interdisciplinary researchers at Rensselaer has developed a new method for significantly increasing the heat transfer rate across two different materials. This is just one example of the important nanotechnology research taking place at Rensselaer.  
   

Center for Automation Technologies and Systems Director John Wen presented a talk on “University-Industry Partnership for Next Generation Manufacturing,” in the session on Building Advanced Manufacturing Industries in New York.

Rensselaer has a long and broad history of collaborative, leading-edge nanotechnology research. Rensselaer’s Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center, one of the original National Science Foundation-funded nanotechnology centers in the country (2001), with matching funds from NYSTAR, has conducted basic research for more than a dozen years. Other Rensselaer nanotechnology research partnerships that have received support from New York state include, for example: the Computational Center for Nanotechnology Innovations (home to Rensselaer’s “supercomputer”), the Center for Biotechnology and Interdisciplinary Studies, the Center for Automation Technologies and Systems, the Center for Future Energy Systems, the Smart Lighting Engineering Research Centers, and the Interconnect Focus Center.

“These are the kinds of tools and partnerships that make Rensselaer and our region attractive to talented individuals, entrepreneurs, and high tech businesses,” President Jackson said.

In emphasizing the importance of these types of partnerships in strengthening the economy, President Jackson says that a strong innovation ecosystem requires four fundamental components: (1) strategic focus, (2) game-changing idea generation, (3) translational pathways to bring discoveries into commercial or societal use, and (4) capital, including financial, infrastructural, and human capital.

“To address the key global challenges, create new jobs, and remain competitive, we must collaborate across sectors and disciplines, educate the next generations, invest in research, and continue to strengthen our innovation ecosystems,” President Jackson said.

* * *
*
* *
Inside Rensselaer
Volume 7, Number 8, April 26, 2013
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Return to front
Front Page
*
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute | About RPI | Virtual Campus Tour | Academics | Research | Student Life | Admissions | News & Events