Inside Rensselaer
Volume 6, No. 15, October 12, 2012
   
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Mark Century

Harry Ruda ’69

The research team of Carothers, Shepard, Xu, and Ji will perform calculations using the Rensselaer supercomputing center, the Computational Center for Nanotechnology Innovations. Photo by Trish Galvin
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$2.6 Million Study Uses Video Cards To Bring Supercomputing to Hospitals for Safer CT Scans

Video gamers are generally the biggest consumers of computer graphics cards, using the devices to boost the speed and resolution of their digital quests to fend off invading extraterrestrials or outwit hostile dragons. But researchers at Rensselaer seek to harness the power of these computer graphics cards to solve one of the world’s most pressing health-care technology challenges: radiation exposure from X-ray and CT imaging scans.

Rensselaer nuclear engineering expert X. George Xu is leading an interdisciplinary team of academic, medical, and industrial researchers to develop new techniques for quickly calculating the radiation dose a patient will receive from a CT scan. Funded by a $2.6 million grant from the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, the research team aims to use NVIDIA video cards and leading-edge parallel processing techniques to help reduce radiation dose calculations from 10 hours to less than 60 seconds. The team seeks to test this technology at Massachusetts General Hospital using General Electric’s LightSpeed CT scanners.

“With this new study, we hope to bring massively parallel computing power—currently available only to national laboratories and major research universities such as Rensselaer—to busy and resource-limited hospitals,” said Xu, professor in the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering (MANE) and the Department of Biomedical Engineering, who heads the university’s Nuclear Engineering Program. “There is a high level of interest at the national level to quantify and reduce the amount of ionizing radiation involved in medical imaging. Our parallel computing method has the potential to be used in everyday clinical procedures, which would dramatically decrease the amount of radiation we receive from CT scans.”

Three Rensselaer faculty members are partnering with Xu on this study: Wei Ji, assistant professor in MANE; Christopher Carothers, professor in the Department of Computer Science; and Mark Shephard, the Samuel A. Johnson ’37 and Elisabeth C. Johnson Professor of Engineering and director of the university’s Scientific Computation Research Center.

As part of the study, the research team will perform calculations using the Rensselaer supercomputing center, the Computational Center for Nanotechnology Innovations (CCNI).

Medical imaging scans can provide invaluable information to physicians, and the clinical benefits of a single X-ray or CT scan almost always outweigh the risks of radiation exposure from the procedure. But this radiation exposure risk accumulates over a patient’s lifetime, and is a growing concern given the increased frequency with which CT scans are prescribed and performed.

A 2009 report by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements, of which Xu is a member, details how the U.S. population is now exposed to seven times more radiation every year from medical imaging exams than it was in 1980. While CT scans only account for 10 percent of diagnostic radiological exams, the procedure contributes disproportionately—about 67 percent—to the national collective medical radiation exposure.

To help mitigate this risk, several national and international bodies have called for the establishment of a centralized “dose registry” system. Such a system would track over time the number of CT scans a patient undergoes, and the radiation exposure resulting from those procedures. However, current software packages for determining and for tracking CT doses are insufficient for such a critical task, Xu said.

To read more, go to news.rpi.edu/update.do?artcenterkey=3083.

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Inside Rensselaer
Volume 6, Number 15, October 12, 2012
©2012 Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
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