Inside Rensselaer
* Robert Linharadt

Robert Linhardt

Susan Gilbert

Susan Gilbert

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Biology Program Symposium: At the Interface
Sixteen researchers, including professors Robert Linhardt, Angel Garcia, and keynote speaker John Condeelis ’71, presented their findings and latest work at the Center for Biotechnology and Interdisciplinary Studies on May 22. The Rensselaer Biology Program Symposium was a forum for those whose research, regardless of experimental approach, addresses important issues in the life sciences.

Event coordinator Susan Gilbert, professor and head of the Department of Biology, said, “Today’s most exciting advances and future challenges are at the interface of biology and chemistry, physics, mathematics, and engineering, as well as computation and information technology. This symposium was a forum to present and discuss our latest findings and to develop new collaborations that cross disciplines and departments. It was also an opportunity to showcase the research happening at Rensselaer and throughout the Capital District.”

The diversity of the topics discussed embodied the multidisciplinary spirit of the Center for Biotechnology and Interdisciplinary Studies, encouraging collaboration among many diverse academic and research disciplines to enhance discovery and innovation. Dr. John Condeelis ’71, professor and co-chair of anatomy and structural biology at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, presented the keynote.  Condeelis received his bachelor’s degree in physics from Rensselaer in 1971 and his Ph.D. from SUNY-Albany. After postdoctoral training at Harvard University, he joined the faculty of Albert Einstein, where he is also the scientific director of the Albert Einstein Analytical Imaging Facility. He is the principal investigator, with Dr. James Castracane of the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, SUNY-Albany, as co-principal investigator, on the National Cancer Institute-funded Tumor Microenvironment Study. The goal of this five-year study is to develop a next-generation microchip that, when placed in a cancerous mass, can gather information on the presence of metastatic cells that would demand more aggressive cancer therapy.
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Inside Rensselaer, Strategic Communications and External Relations
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Inside Rensselaer
Volume 2, Number 12, August 8, 2008
©2008 Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
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