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H1N1 Influenza
Influenza Pandemic Home Page
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New York State
Swine Flu Hotline:

1-800-808-1987

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The H1N1 Flu (Swine Flu) Outbreak

Updated: 8/28/09, 2:39 PM

General Information
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* If you have questions, we have answers about H1N1 (formerly known as Swine Flu).

What is H1N1 (swine flu)?

H1N1 (referred to as “swine flu” early on) is a new influenza virus causing illness in people.  It was first detected in humans in the United States in April 2009.  Other countries, including Mexico and Canada, have reported people sick with the new virus.  The virus is spreading from person-to-person, probably in much the same way that regular seasonal influenza viruses spread.

What are the signs and symptoms of the H1N1 virus in people?

The symptoms of H1N1 flu virus in people are similar to the symptoms of seasonal flu and include fever, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, body aches, headache, chills and fatigue.  A significant number of people who have been infected with this virus also have reported diarrhea and vomiting.  Also, like seasonal flu, severe illnesses and death have occurred as a result of illness associated with the virus.

How does H1N1 virus spread?

Spread of H1N1 virus is thought to be happening in the same way that seasonal flu spreads.  Flu viruses are spread mainly from person to person through coughing or sneezing by people with influenza.  Sometimes people may become infected by touching something with flu viruses on it and then touching their mouth or nose.

How long can an infected person spread this virus to others?

At the current time, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) believe that this virus has the same properties in terms of spread as seasonal flu viruses.  With seasonal flu, studies have shown that people may be contagious from one day before they develop symptoms to up to 7 days after they get sick.  Children, especially younger children, might potentially be contagious for longer periods.  CDC is studying the virus and its capabilities to try to learn more and will provide more information as it becomes available.

Is there a vaccine for H1N1?

There are 5 companies currently working on development and testing of a vaccine for the use in the United States.  Unfortunately, there have been several difficulties in the manufacturing process.  This has lead to a decreased estimate of the amount of vaccine that will be available this fall and has also pushed back the date of expected introduction.  Currently, we anticipate that vaccine could be available for Rensselaer as early as November, but could be as late as January.  We do have a distribution plan that will go into effect as soon as it does become available.

— Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/qa.htm viewed on August 5th, 2009.

For additional information see  http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/general_info.htm

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