*
*
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
About RPI Academics Research Student Life Admissions News Tour
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
H1N1 Influenza
Influenza Pandemic Home Page
General Information
Signs & Symptoms
H1N1 Prevention
Student Resources
Parents & Family Resources
Faculty & Staff Resources
H1N1 Frequently Asked Questions
Campus Status Information
Resources, Documents, Information about the Pandemic
Rensselaer Student Health Center
*
New York State
Swine Flu Hotline:

1-800-808-1987

*
*
The H1N1 Flu (Swine Flu) Outbreak

Updated: 2/2/10, 11:34 AM

*

February 2, 2010
To: The Rensselaer Community
From: Leslie Lawrence, M.D.
Medical Director, Student Health Center,
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

H1N1 Update

I hope everyone enjoyed a safe and healthy vacation and start to the new semester. It has been several months since I last communicated with you on the status of the H1N1 influenza virus.

There have been no new cases of H1N1 on the Rensselaer campus since I wrote before the semester break. This is positive news and a strong indication that the winter wave of the illness has passed. But, please remain vigilant in your flu and illness prevention habits as a second wave of the illness is still projected by many experts.

We have received another supply of H1N1 vaccinations. We will hold an H1N1 vaccination clinic Thursday, Feb. 4 in the Darrin Communications Center (DCC) from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. This clinic will be open to all Rensselaer students, faculty, and staff.

Vaccination remains your best protection from getting the H1N1 virus. The CDC is reporting that the vaccine is among the safest of any vaccine ever given, with no major side effects being reported in the entire country.

I will remain in touch with the campus community if we see additional cases on the campus.

Please do your part to prevent a second wave of infection. Use the hand washing and other flu-prevention precautions we have discussed all through the fall and winter. They will protect you from the flu, as well as a host of other illnesses that can progress around a college campus. These precautions include:

  • Vaccination with the 2009 H1N1 vaccine;
  • Washing your hands often, especially after shaking hands with others (hand disinfectants may be used if there is no access to soap and water);
  • Avoiding close contact with people who are sick;
  • Covering your mouth and nose with a tissue when coughing or sneezing;
  • Covering your mouth and nose with the inside of your elbow if you do not have a tissue;
  • Not touching your eyes, nose, or mouth, especially after contact with others; and
  • Keeping a three-foot [one-meter] distance between yourself and anyone who is ill.

Leslie Lawrence, M.D.
Medical Director, Student Health Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Previous Communications:

*
Faculty & Staff H1N1 Attendance Reporting
Student H1N1 Reporting

Rensselaer H1N1 Vaccination Clinic

Thursday Feb. 4, 2010
10 a.m. - 8 p.m.
DCC Great Hall

Open to all Rensselaer students, faculty, and staff


*
*

A Message from the Medical Director

The H1N1 influenza outbreak continues to grow in the United States and internationally. We are monitoring this issue closely in coordination with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and state and county health departments.

As we continue to monitor the outbreak, it is vital that the Rensselaer community stay informed. This Web site will serve as a clearinghouse for information and news on any impacts of the illness to the Institute, ways to protect your health, and actions the Institute is taking to protect the health of our community.

Check back often for additional news and information. Please also visit the links on this page to learn about the best ways to protect yourself from getting sick or spreading the illness. You play the most important role in protecting your health and the health of our entire community.

Leslie Lawrence, M.D.
Rensselaer Student Health Center

*
*
* What is H1N1 Flu? *
*
H1N1 influenza (also known as “swine flu”) is a respiratory disease of pigs caused by type A influenza viruses. Outbreaks of swine flu happen regularly in pigs. People do not normally get swine flu, but human infections can and do happen. Most commonly, human cases of swine flu happen in people who are around pigs but it’s possible for swine flu viruses to spread from person to person also.
*
Source: U.S. Government
*
* Remember... *
*

Wash your hands.

*

Cover your cough.

*

Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth.

*

Stay home when you are sick.

*
*
*

* * *
*
**
*
**
Copyright ©1996-2009 Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)  110 Eighth Street, Troy, NY USA 12180  (518) 276-6000  All rights reserved.
*
Why not change the world?SM is a service mark of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.
Site design and production by the Rensselaer Division of Strategic Communications & External Relations
*
*
*